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Today's Opinions

  • Math is clear, money not there for new school

    Many good letters have been published by the Roane County News regarding the new school initiative.

    I will not go over their points that have already been well described.

    The matter is much simpler than we have been told.

    The question of building a new school system is academic. We simply do not have the money.

    Local entities are unlikely to gift us the funding, after TVA saw what we did with their ash spill grant.

    Roane County is not wealthy, nor is it likely to become so.

  • Going With the Flo: We must recognize God’s hand in history and schools

    By Flo Charles

    One of the most important elements to the longevity of any nation is the educational system.

    The Founders believed schools and educational systems were a proper means to encourage that “religion, morality and knowledge” were necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind.

    Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), a Founding Father and signer of the Declaration of Independence, was the leading educator in America and called the Father of Education under the Constitution.

  • Thank you, Midtown Choir, for bringing dogs much happiness

    Hats off to Beth Trescher and her choir from Midtown Elementary School for serenading the animals at the Roane County Animal Shelter.

    These dogs and other animals are there because they got lost or someone did not want them anymore. Can you imagine how the pets feel after being with a family and all of a sudden they’re locked in a cage?

  • Glimpses From a Teacher Historian: Does nostalgia override reform?

    By Mark Banker

    Several recent letters to the editor have expressed reservations about proposed plans for Roane County’s public schools.

    Last Friday, one lengthy letter introduced readers to philosopher-educator John Dewey and connected Dewey’s influence to today’s ongoing educational debates.

  • Proposed school geographically not a smart move

    The proposal to build a consolidated high school about one mile from the Rockwood city limits is foolish from a human and physical geography standpoint.

    Kingston high school has the largest student population in Roane County. It would be foolish to require a school which has the largest student population to move 8 miles away to a campus near Rockwood.

    I’m shocked that the parents of Kingston high students are not publicly outraged at the decision to move their school out of Kingston since it has the largest student population.

  • Going With the Flo: We must repent, arise and help our president build

    By Flo Charles

    Let us arise and build!

    These were the words of the people in the book of Nehemiah (from the Bible) after Nehemiah saw the walls of Jerusalem were broken down.

    Nehemiah faced the same fierce, hate, intimidation and ridicule that our president is facing today. They attempted to distract and coerce him into changing his mind, but it didn’t work.

  • A View From Lick Skillet: Would it really be a Rockwood Mega-school?

    Gentle reader, inasmuch as the mega-school plan is by far the most important public issue to confront our community for some little time, we feel it not out of order to devote an inordinate amount of time and space to that issue in our columns for the time being, so this column will be so focused.

    First of all, we have been addressed with this question: Why are the Rockwood head men so strongly pushing this plan to eliminate their high school when, since the memory of man runneth not to the contrary, Rockwood leadership has always strongly supported their community school?

  • Would school plan be another failed, costly experiment in education?

    I begin this letter with a question related to education: Who was John Dewey?

    He gave us the Dewey Decimal System.

    Dewey was a philosopher and prolific writer. A bibliography of Dewey’s writing is more than 150 pages in length.

    Unknown to many is the fact that Dewey viewed education and teachers as social change agents. He was known as “a man of all knowledge.”